Fri. 2/ 16 – Read Anything Friday

NO HOMEWORK FOR THE VACATION (unless you are behind in reading your novel).

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO ENJOY READING.

Novel TitleWhere you should be...
Between Shades of Graypg. 207
Book Thiefpg. 333
Chainspg. 180
Counting by 7’spg. 234
Graveyard Bookpg. 180
House of the Scorpionpg. 234
Matchedpg. 225
Out of My Mindpg. 180
Part Time Indianpg. 144
Tuck Everlastingpg. 108
Ugliespg. 243
Unwindpg. 207
Weaselpg. 90
Wednesday Warspg. 162

Thu. 2/15 – Media Project Overview

NO HOMEWORK TONIGHT.  If you choose to, you can read to keep up with your book club goals.

TOMORROW IS READ ANYTHING DAY.  Bring a book, magazine, or other reading material that you would like to enjoy.  Of course, you can read your novels for the project.  Stop by the library to check out a book for the break and start it tomorrow!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO learn more about some of the media project options, and use your time today independently to finish notebook work, project drafts, or read.

DO NOW – Take out your project handout.  Write down the project due date: Tuesday, March 13.  As we go over the media project ideas, jot down any relevant information that is important to you.

Prezi.com – presentation app for dynamic visual analysis

Wordclouds.com – online app for creating “word clouds” for textual analysis

 

 

2/14 – Theme Analysis

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Come to Extra Help today or tomorrow for the Adjective/Adverb makeup assignment, if applicable.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO go over the Adjectives/Adverbs Quiz, read with setting in mind and begin drawing a setting map or setting illustration.

DO NOW – Write today’s heading, “2/14 – Setting Map”

  • Use your time today to sketch out a map of the novel’s setting or an illustration of a key part of the setting.
  • The map does not have to be literal (country borders, accurate street and distance details) but should present a depiction of key places in the novel
  • The map should be reflective of the mood or different moods of the story.  Use colors and details to make the mood clear.
  • Use arrows, roadways, colorful or bold lines or other methods to connect the places together.  
  • IDEA: If appropriate, use a “board game” approach if the places are visited in some sequence.  In other words, wind the path of the story around the page and through the different settings.
  • Clearly label all parts of the map, and if necessary, provide some written details to make your map clear.  (a LEGEND is useful….)
  • If you are drawing a setting illustration, your artwork must be well-detailed and clearly depict the mood of the place.

Tue. 2/13 – Exploring Setting, Group Planning

NO HOMEWORK TONIGHT unless you need to catch up on your reading or notebook work. (Notebook check coming after the break!)

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO read with an eye looking out for setting details and spend time choosing project work with your book club.

DO NOW – Write down today’s notebook heading, “2/13 – Setting Details in my Novel.”  

  • As you read today, write down a bulleted list of setting locations in your novel
  • Include specific details of these setting locations that stand out in your mind.
  • Also describe the mood of each place.

Book Club Session 1: Setting Details

  • In your group today, discuss the setting details you listed in your notebook.
  • Be aware of where each club member is in the story and avoid sharing details from beyond that point.
  • Add to your list any settings, setting details, or mood details that you missed.

Book Club Session 2: Project Planning/Strategizing

  • Discuss which project choices you intend to work on.  
  • Discuss which project choices are most compatible with your novel.
  • Consider this:  if you intend to create a video trailer or scene for one of the media project choices, you may work with a partner and receive credit for the same assignment.  Discuss the possibilities with your group if you are interested.  

If you have additional time…

  • Discuss the scenes you wrote and your ideas about the central conflict.  Come to an agreement about the conflict, regardless of whether or not your scene reflects that conflict (you will still get notebook credit for the scene).
  • Continue reading or catch up on notebook work that  you haven’t finished.

Mon. 2/12 – Point of View Switch

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Finish protagonist switch scene for tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading and analyze the main conflict through a scene narrated by a different character.

DO NOW – Set up your notebook for today’s work: “2/12 – Point of View Switch”

Friday you explored all of the pressures faced internally and externally by the protagonist of your novel.  Which one is the most important struggle going on in the main character’s story?  That important struggle is the CENTRAL CONFLICT of the story.  

In your notebook, WRITE about this central conflict.  Explain what the struggle is about, and what motivates the protagonist to face and overcome this struggle.

Next, remember a moment in the novel in which the central conflict is clearly expressed or shown.  It can be an important conversation or a situation in which the main character experiences the conflict.

Below your explanation of the central conflict, WRITE a different version of the scene told by another character.  The details and dialogue should be the same, but you will provide the thoughts and reactions of a different character who understands the conflict (and is probably involved in it).

The scene should be at least a page long in your notebook.

If you are having difficulty choosing a scene, it may be helpful to list, in order, the important events in the story.  That will help you focus on the moments that reveal the central conflict.

  • You will be on your own to use class time today.  If you choose, you can complete the written assignment first.  Or, you can read through the period and complete it for homework.  

Fri. 2/9 – Conflict

NO HOMEWORK THIS WEEKEND

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading with a focus on the conflict(s) experienced by the protagonist in the novel.

DO NOW – Get your notebook ready for today’s work: “2/9 – Conflict”

As you read, pay attention to the pressures your character is dealing with.  

EXTERNAL PRESSURES come from outside forces.  Is your protagonist struggling against another person, society, technology, nature, a supernatural force?

INTERNAL PRESSURES come from a character’s own thoughts, beliefs and emotions.  Is your protagonist struggling against the pressures of doubts, fears, confusion, frustration?

Your character can face many pressures and conflicts from within his/her own mind and from outside sources.  Make a list as you read and be ready to share in  your group talk later in the period.

Book Club Meeting

Today, begin by sharing your character analysis details.  You do not need to read your paragraph.  Add to your own notes as needed.

Then, discuss the pressures the protagonist is facing in the novel.  Discuss any and all possible areas of conflict.

Devise a VISUAL way to illustrate the conflicts affecting your main character.  You can use the above chart, or you can come up with your own idea.  Use color to enhance the illustration.

Thu. 2/8 – Adjective/Adverb Quiz

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Complete character analysis for tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO take the quiz and then read your novel.  If you have time, you may take some time today to draft your character analysis paragraph.

DO NOW – Clear your desks for the quiz.  You will need a pencil.

When you finish the quiz:

  • Wait for it to be collected.
  • Read your novel.
  • Work on the character analysis paragraph in your notebook:

Describe the PROTAGONIST of your novel.  Provide insight into her/his STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, POTENTIAL, and any other qualities that make her/him INTERESTING.  Share MULTIPLE details from your novel to support your conclusions.

Wed. 2/7 – Book Clubs Day 2

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK: Adjective/Adverb Quiz tomorrow!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading your novel and have your first book club discussion.

DO NOW – Take out your novels and get reading!

It’s important for you to read at a pace (pages per day) that enables you to finish the novel and have time to complete your project.  Here’s a suggested pacing for the current unit, by novel.

Novel TitlePages Per Day
Between Shades of Gray23 pages per day
Book Thief37 pages per day
Chains20 pages per day
Counting by 7’s26 pages per day
Graveyard Book20 pages per day
House of the Scorpion26 pages per day
Matched25 pages per day
Out of My Mind20 pages per day
Part Time Indian16 pages per day
Tuck Everlasting12 pages per day
Uglies27 pages per day
Unwind23 pages per day
Weasel10 pages per day
Wednesday Wars18 pages per day

Book Club Discussion #1 – PROTAGONISTS

  • Write your heading for today’s work in your notebook: use the above heading and today’s date.
  • In your group today, take turns briefly sharing the details of your writing from yesterday.
  • Then, discuss the following question:

What makes your main character STRONG and INTERESTING? If you feel your character is not “strong,” discuss the character’s POTENTIAL.  

  • Write down any valuable details from your discussion to help you write a character analysis (to be assigned soon).

 

Tue. 2/6 – Book Clubs Day 1

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Adjectives/Adverbs quiz Thursday; Finish castle learning assignments by tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO begin reading your novel.

DO NOW – When you receive your novel, PRINT your name on the inside cover along with 2018 and Huntley.  Fill out your “Bingo” handout (name/period, and name/author/title on back) and put in your binder.

WRAP-UP

For the last few minutes, take time to make sense of what you read today.  Open your notebook to a new page and write today’s date, along with the title and author of your novel.

In a PARAGRAPH, write about any or all of the following:

  • The PROTAGONIST of your novel – what do you know about him/her so far?
  • The SETTING – what kind of place is it, and what are some specific details? 
  • What is the MOOD of the novel so far?
  • What QUESTIONS do you have about the story so far?

Mon. 2/5 – Adjectives & Adverbs Review

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK 

  • Finish Castle Learning reviews by Wednesday
  • Adverbs & Adjectives Quiz Thursday – includes comparatives, superlatives and double negatives!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO review for Thursday’s quiz so that you know what to study and what to expect AND learn about your project for the next reading unit.

DO NOW – Take out your adverbs and adjectives notes and two practice handouts.

  • After you have received your handout, complete the practice quiz.
  • Correct all problems and annotate as needed. 

THE BINGO PROJECT.

 

Fri. 2/2 – Book Tasting!

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK:  Adverbs & Adjectives Quiz Thursday – includes comparatives, superlatives, and double negatives

TODAY WE ARE IN THE LIBRARY sampling the books that interest you for our upcoming book clubs unit (see Thursday’s post).  Bon Appetit!

Thu. 2/1 – Adverbs & Adjectives Review

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK

  • Core Workout 3 is due tomorrow.  Be ready to submit your answer sheet and short response final draft.
  • Report to the library tomorrow!  Bring the list of book titles that interest you.
  • Finish Castle Learning reviews by Tuesday next week.
  • Adverbs & Adjectives quiz next Thursday.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reviewing adverb and adjective usage to prepare for a quiz next Thursday.

DO NOW – Quick review of double negatives!

For more information, click the link below.

Double Negatives (Grammar Monster)

“I cannot say that I do not disagree with you.”–Groucho Marx

(This is a triple negative. If you follow it through logically, you’ll find it means I disagree with you.)

 

Wed. 1/31 – Castle Learning

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Core Workout 3 due Friday.  Report to Computer Lab 209 again tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO log into Castlelearning.com and work on some practice assignments for adverbs and adjectives.  Then, you will research the novels you will be sampling during Friday’s Book Tasting in the Library.

DO NOW – Log into your computer.  Go to CastleLearning.com and log into your account.  Select Mr. Huntley’s assignments and get to work.

  • Place your notebook on the front desk to be checked.
  • After finishing one of the assignments, look at the list of books below and learn more about some of the titles.

Friday’s Book Tasting Menu Selections – Click the book title/author for a link to Goodreads, where you can learn  more about the novel.

Realistic Fiction

Literature that is set in the real world, usually in the current time, in which characters deal with problems most readers can relate to.

Historical Fiction 

Literature that is set in the real world during a historically significant event or time period.  Characters deal with problems related to the historical event or society at the time.

Fantasy

Literature that is set in an imagined universe with its own rules regarding what is possible.  Often magic and unusual creatures are a part of the story.  Also, fantasy usually involves an adventure or quest and a sense that the main character must fulfill his or her destiny.

Dystopian

Literature about an imagined society or state, often set in the future, exploring social and political conflicts in which characters face poverty, squalor or oppression.  (A distorted Utopia—A “perfect’ place)

Tue. 1/30 – Degrees of Comparison

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Core Workout 3 due Friday.  Be prepared for your next notebook check tomorrow (Sherlock Holmes notes/writing). 

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO review your adverbs homework from last week and review words/endings that express degrees of comparison.

DO NOW – Take out your adverbs assignment.  Have your adverbs notes handy as we discuss the assignment.

Next, write the following in your notebook:

DEGREES OF COMPARISON

Adjectives and adverbs help you make comparisons.

  • Positive degree – describe one thing: You run fast.
  • Comparative degree – compare two things: You run faster than Joe.
  • Superlative degree – compare three or more things: You run the fastest on the team.

PRACTICE

Complete both sides of the handout.  

Use your adjective and adverb notes and the chart on p. 203 to help you complete your assignment.

When you are finished, you may work on your Core Workout assignment.

Mon. 1/29 – Core Workout #3

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Core Workout #3 (and all 4 notebook responses) due Friday.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO work on Core Workout #3 after reviewing expectations and strategies for optimizing your potential.

DO NOW – Take out your adverbs homework to be checked.  When you receive your Core Workout, write your name on the top of the front, as well as the back answer page.

CORE WORKOUT STRATEGIES

    1. Read all the questions first.  Have a purpose for reading.  
    2. Read the whole passage.  Try to make sense of it as a whole narrative.  Try to et the big picture or gist of it.
    3. Read the questions again.  Any that you can answer easily?  Get them out of the way.
    4. This would be the time to take a break or come back to it another time.
    5. Read the passage again (if you are coming back to it on another day, read the questions first).
    6. Circle, underline, box or highlight anything that seems important or clearly helps you respond to a question.  Be sure to write a helpful word or two next to the places where you mark the text to remind yourself what you were thinking.
    7. Answer the questions you can handle, and star/circle the ones that are stumping you.  Use process of elimination to knock out obviously wrong answer choices.
    8. This would be a good time to work on the writing responses.  Often writing about the passage can help you understand it more clearly.
    9. Since you have been given the time to do so, read the passage again while thinking about the troublesome questions.
    10. Choose answers to the final questions.  If you are using time wisely, you will have time to come back to them again.  If not, reassure yourself that you have tried your best! 

 

  1. Read

Mon.-Wed. 1/22-24 – The Hound of the Baskervilles

NO HOMEWORK TONIGHT unless you did not submit your Mystery Essay

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO watch an episode of the BBC series “Sherlock” based on one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes novels…The Hound of the Baskervilles

DO NOW: Open your notebook and set up your notes page with the following heading – “1/22 – Hound of the Baskervilles”

The Hound of the Baskervilles

SUSPECTS
(who may have committed the crime)
MOTIVES
(the suspect's reason for committing the crime)
CLUES
(unusual details Holmes notices--or you notice--that help solve the case)
PREDICTIONS
(your thoughts, as you read, on what happened)

After reading, you will write your Hound of the Baskervilles case analysis

  • Who brought the case to Holmes and Watson?  Why?
  • Who are the suspects, and why?
  • What clues or unusual details did Holmes learn about or discover?
  • How did Holmes catch the criminal and solve the case?

Fri. 1/19 – Finishing the Mystery Essay

NO HOMEWORK unless you haven’t finished the essay!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO finish your Mystery Genre Analysis Essay and submit it to turnitin.com.

DO NOW – When you get your laptop, log in and open up your preferred word processing app (Word on the computer, Office Online, or Google Docs).

If you finish, you may read a Sherlock Holmes mystery.  Consider reading the original versions of the stories above.  Here is a link to the complete canon:

Doyle – Sherlock Holmes Complete

Refer to yesterday’s post for more details.

Thu. 1/18 – Mystery Genre Analysis Essay

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Mystery Genre Analysis essay due TOMORROW.  Submit to Turnitin.com.  Finish tonight for homework, if necessary.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO draft your Mystery Genre Analysis Essay.

DO NOW – When you get your laptop, log in and open up your preferred word processing app (Word on the computer, Office Online, or Google Docs).

What makes a Mystery a Mystery?  After reading several Sherlock Holmes stories, it should be no mystery to you.  Write a three paragraph essay (introduction, body, conclusion) in which you define the mystery genre and then provide several criteria to support your definition.  

  • Begin with an introduction that defines the genre and introduces your main ingredients.  
  • In your body paragraph, discuss several “ingredients” and refer to multiple (three or more) Sherlock Holmes mysteries OR other mysteries you have read.  
  • Conclude by summing up your main points and discussing why people like reading mysteries.

Refer to the mystery recipe handout (link below) as you write.

Mystery Recipe

Also refer to the mysteries we have read, if you need to:

Doyle – Five Orange Pips (abridged)

Doyle – Dying Detective (play)

Doyle – Red-Headed League (play)

Doyle – Speckled Band (abridged)

Tue. 1/16 – The Adventure of the Speckled Band

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Write a Mystery Ingredient List in your notebook and be prepared to share tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO read another Sherlock Holmes mystery, analyze the case, and begin thinking about the features of the mystery genre.

DO NOW – Write today’s notebook heading: “1/16 – The Speckled Band”

As you read today, you will gather the usual details about the case:

The Speckled Band

SUSPECTS
(who may have committed the crime)
MOTIVES
(the suspect's reason for committing the crime)
CLUES
(unusual details Holmes notices--or you notice--that help solve the case)
PREDICTIONS
(your thoughts, as you read, on what happened)

After reading, you will write your Speckled Band Case Analysis

  • Who brought the case to Holmes and Watson?  Why?
  • Who are the suspects, and why?
  • What clues or unusual details did Holmes learn about or discover?
  • How did Holmes catch the criminal and solve the case?

Tonight, you will consider all of the mysteries we have read so far, and develop a list of ingredients that are essential to a good mystery.  Use any of the information you have gathered as we have read “The Red-Headed League,” “The Dying Detective,” and “The Speckled Band.”  Make sure your list is made up of ingredients common to multiple mysteries.  For each ingredient, provide an example from the stories we have read so far.

 

Fri. 1/12 – The art of Deduction

NO HOMEWORK THIS WEEKEND.  Study for math midterms?

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO finish our discussion of “The Dying Detective” and explore how Sherlock Holmes does his thing.

DO NOW: Open your notebook to yesterday’s work.

Warm-up. Based on what you read yesterday, write a brief explanation the trap Sherlock Holmes set for Culverton Smith.

Write your “Dying Detective” Final Analysis Paragraph in which you discuss:

  • The situation that begins the story – what appeared to be going on and what was really going on.
  • Clues that helped reveal something unusual was happening.
  • The suspect and the crime he committed and/or attempted.
  • How Sherlock Holmes caught the criminal.

And now…another look at Sherlock Holmes’ powers of deduction.

 

 

Thu. 1/11 – “The Dying Detective”

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Complete “Dying Detective” final analysis in your notebooks for tomorrow.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO read another Sherlock Holmes mystery, and continue our inquiry into the mystery genre…and AT LONG LAST, TURN IN YOUR BOOK PROJECTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

DO NOW – Take out your book projects.  Then, write today’s notebook heading: “1/11 – The Case of the Dying Detective”

Set up your page the same way you set up the chart for the last mystery we read:

The Dying Detective

SUSPECTS
(who may have committed the crime)
MOTIVES
(the suspect's reason for committing the crime)
CLUES
(unusual details Holmes notices--or you notice--that help solve the case)
PREDICTIONS
(your thoughts, as you read, on what happened)

AFTER READING, write a “Dying Detective” Final Analysis Paragraph in which you discuss:

  • Who brought the case to the attention of Holmes and Watson
  • The crime that was committed or about to be committed
  • Who did it, and how
  • How Sherlock Holmes solved the case, including clues he discovered, and steps he took to catch the criminal.

Wed. 1/10 – “The Red-Headed League”

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK The Quote Book is due tomorrow!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO finish reading “The Red-Headed League” and discuss the features of a mystery.  Also, we will finish reviewing the grammar diagnostic.

DO NOW – Open your notebooks to the chart you created for “The Red-Headed League”

Write a “Red-Headed League” Final Analysis Paragraph in which you discuss:

  • Who brought the case to the attention of Holmes and Watson
  • The crime that was committed or about to be committed
  • Who did it, and how
  • How Sherlock Holmes solved the case, including clues he discovered, and steps he took to catch the criminal.
  • If you are having trouble starting the paragraph, you can use this sentence: A man named Billings came to Sherlock Holmes with a problem.

Grammar Self-analysis

On the post-it note, write down which parts of speech you had the most difficulty with, and any others you feel you do  not fully understand.

Tue. 1/9 – Sherlock Holmes

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Your quote book project is due Thursday.  

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO get your first taste of Sherlock Holmes as we read, “The Red-Headed League.”  But first, let’s review the parts of speech.

DO NOW #1 – Take out your grammar diagnostic from yesterday.  We will go over the answers, as well as review the parts of speech.  We will also refer to page 9 of your student handbook.

DO NOW #2 – Write down today’s heading in your notebook: “1/9 – Sherlock Holmes – Red-Headed League”

Words to know:

  • SUSPECTS – people who may have committed a crime (also a verb, suspect, to believe something without proof)
  • MOTIVES – the reasons behind a person’s actions (in a mystery, the reason a person would commit a crime)
  • CLUES – pieces of evidence that may lead to solving the crime
  • PREDICTIONS – your ideas on who committed the crime, or how Sherlock Holmes solves the mystery.

Create a windowpane chart (divide page into four boxes) in your notebook, writing the above words in each box.  As we read, add details.

Mon. 1/8 – Two “Quizzes”

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Book Project Due Thursday; submit now if you are ready!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO find out how observant you are, and how much you know about the parts of speech.

DO NOW – Locate your English Handbook and open to page 9.  If you cannot find it, you will not be able to use it.  While you wait, review the parts of speech. 

1. Parts of Speech Diagnostic

  • Write your name on the handout; you will keep it in your binder for reference.
  • Write your name on the Scantron.  You will be submitting it after the diagnostic.
  • When you finish the diagnostic, you can work on your project or exchange finished projects with someone else in the room.

2.  Observation Quiz

  • In your notebook, write today’s heading: “1/8 – Observation Quiz”
  • Clear your desks of everything except your notebook and a pen or pencil.  
  • You may not leave your seat for any reason.  
  • Ready? Let’s begin!

Wed. 1/3 – Quote Log Check & Project Work Day

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Quote Book project due Tuesday (project information, here)

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO work on your project while waiting for your quote log to be checked.

DO NOW – Take out the materials you will need today, your notebook and novel.

Today is a SILENT WORK DAY.  During the notebook check, you can do any or all of the following:

  • Read your novel
  • Work on revising your analysis
  • Select additional quotes and analyze them
  • Type up your project work (if you have a computer or tablet with you)
  • Work on your booklet cover
  • Read another novel

Tue. 1/2 – New Year, New Thinking

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Notebook Check for Quote Log tomorrow; Quote Book project due Tue. 1/9 (Handout link, here)

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO think about where you’re going and how your are going to get there.  Also, you will read or work on your quote book project. 

DO NOW: Write today’s notebook heading – “1/2 – Think Different” 

We will be reading a quote today and watching a brief video.  Afterward, you will consider how the quote and video apply to you, or how you might take inspiration from them. 

Quote: Excerpt from “Citizenship in a Republic,” a speech given by Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States, at the Sorbonne in Paris, France on April 23, 1910:  

The Man in the Arena  

“…It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

  • What is the message Theodore Roosevelt is conveying to his audience? 
  • How does this quote apply to you and your personal experiences, and how might you become “the person in the arena” as you begin this new year?   

Short Video: Television commercial, “Think Different,” by Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, first aired in 1997 after his return to the company he founded.

Transcript:  

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. 

The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. 

About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. 

While some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do. 

People in the video: 

  • Albert Einstein 
  • Bob Dylan 
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. 
  • Richard Branson 
  • John Lennon 
  • Buckminster Fuller 
  • Thomas Edison 
  • Muhammad Ali 
  • Ted Turner 
  • Maria Callas 
  • Mahatma Gandhi 
  • Ameila Earhart 
  • Alfred Hitchcock 
  • Martha Graham 
  • Jim Henson 
  • Frank Lloyd Wright 
  • Pablo Picasso 

Another  quote by Steve Jobs, from the documentary, “One Last Thing” (PBS) 

When you grow up you tend to get told the world is the way it is and your job is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. 

That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact, and that is – everything around you that you call life, was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use. 

The minute that you understand that you can poke life and actually something will, you know if you push in, something will pop out the other side, that you can change it, you can mold it. That’s maybe the most important thing. It’s to shake off this erroneous notion that life is there and you’re just gonna live in it, versus embrace it, change it, improve it, make your mark upon it. 

I think that’s very important and however you learn that, once you learn it, you’ll want to change life and make it better, ’cause it’s kind of messed up, in a lot of ways. Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again. 

  • What is the message Steve Jobs is conveying to his audience?
  • How does this quote apply to you and your personal experiences, or how might you “think differently” about your life as you begin this new year?

 

Thu. 12/21 – Winter Solstice and Vocab. Quiz

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK: 

  • Read your novel 20 minutes each night
  • Notebook work (quotes and analysis) due 1/3
  • Project due 1/9

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO take the vocabulary quiz and then continue reading and working on your book project.

DO NOW: Clear your desks for the vocabulary quiz.

When you are finished with the quiz, you can work on your projects (read, gather quotes, or write analyses)

You can also work on the cover of your mini-book.

Wed. 12/20 – Reading and Notebook Checks

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK

  • Study for tomorrow’s vocabulary quiz
  • Read (and gather quotes and analyze them) 20 minutes per night

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO read your novel and add quotes and analysis to your notebook.

DO NOW – Take out your novels and notebooks.

SILENT READING / BOOK PROJECT WORK TIME

Read your novels quietly, or add quotes and analysis to your notebook.

Be prepared to show your notebook work for the following:

  • Core Workout #2 Responses
  • “Let Me Hear You Whisper” Responses
  • “A Christmas Carol” Responses

If you are unprepared to read today, you will work on the following assignment:

COMPASSION REFLECTION
During this time of year, we are reminded to think of others less fortunate than we are.  Write about the ways that you express COMPASSION.  What skills or talents do you possess that enable you to help others?  Be sure to provide specific examples from your experiences or imagination.

Tue. 12/19 – Reading / Project Day

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK

  • Read (and gather quotes and analyze them) 20 minutes per night
  • Study for Thursday’s vocabulary quiz

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO read your novel and add quotes and analysis to your notebook.

DO NOW – Take out your novels and notebooks.

SILENT READING / BOOK PROJECT WORK TIME

Read your novels quietly, or add quotes and analysis to your notebook.

Be prepared to show your notebook work for the following:

  • Core Workout #2 Responses
  • “Let Me Hear You Whisper” Responses
  • “A Christmas Carol” Responses

If you are unprepared to read today, you will work on the following assignment:

COMPASSION REFLECTION
During this time of year, we are reminded to think of others less fortunate than we are.  Write about the ways that you express COMPASSION.  What skills or talents do you possess that enable you to help others?  Be sure to provide specific examples from your experiences or imagination.

Mon. 12/18 – Core Workout Review

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK

  • Read (and gather quotes and analyze them) 20 minutes per night
  • Notebook check tomorrow: Core Workout responses, “Whisper” notes, and “Christmas Carol” notes.
  • Study for Thursday’s vocabulary quiz

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO go over the answers to Core Workout #2 and then read your novels.

DO NOW – Take out your copy of Core Workout #2, article AND answer sheet.

SILENT READING / BOOK PROJECT WORK TIME

For the remainder of the period, read your novels quietly, or add quotes and analysis to your notebook.

If you are concerned that you will need more writing in your notebook for the check, you can consider writing the following reflection:

COMPASSION REFLECTION
During this time of year, we are reminded to think of others less fortunate than we are.  Write about the ways that you express COMPASSION.  What skills or talents do you possess that enable you to help others?  Be sure to provide specific examples from your experiences or imagination.

Fri. 12/15 – “A Christmas Carol,” The End of It

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel, 20 minutes every night. Vocab. quiz Thursday 12/21.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO begin reading a dramatic adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  Act V performers, be ready to emote!

DO NOW – Set up today’s notebook page: “12/15 – A Christmas Carol Act V”

“A Christmas Carol,” Act 5

 10) This story is Dickens’ most famous work, and one of the most celebrated works of English literature.  Why do you think this story has maintained popularity over the years?  In your response, discuss themes, characters, and other elements of the story.

If you finish, you may read silently or work on a vocabulary enrichment assignment.

Thu. 12/14 – “A Christmas Carol,” Act IV

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel, 20 minutes every night.  “Christmas Carol” vocabulary packet due TOMORROW; quiz Thursday 12/21.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading a dramatic adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  Act IV performers, be ready to emote!

DO NOW – Set up today’s notebook page: “12/14 – A Christmas Carol Act 4”

“A Christmas Carol,” Act 4

8) Why doesn’t the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come speak?  Think about what we understand about the future, and how the ghost forced Scrooge to do all the talking.  Share examples of what Scrooge saw in your answer.

9) Pretend you are Scrooge.  In a brief statement, explain what you are going to do and how you are going to change after your experiences with the ghosts. 

If you finish, you can work on vocabulary or read silently.

Wed. 12/13 – “A Christmas Carol,” Act III

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel, 20 minutes every night.  “Christmas Carol” vocabulary packet due Friday; quiz Thursday 12/21.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading a dramatic adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  Act III performers, be ready to emote!

DO NOW – Set up today’s notebook page: “12/13 – A Christmas Carol Act 3”

“A Christmas Carol,” Act 3

6) Share one experience in Scrooge’s present that provides him with an opportunity to be a better person.  Share details of what he saw.

7) Why does the ghost show Scrooge the two children, Ignorance and Want? 

 

Tue. 12/12 – “A Christmas Carol,” Act II

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel, 20 minutes per night.  “Christmas Carol” vocabulary packet due Friday; quiz Thursday 12/21.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO continue reading a dramatic adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  Act II performers, be ready to emote!

DO NOW – Set up today’s notebook page: “12/12 – A Christmas Carol Act 2”

 “A Christmas Carol,” Act II

4) Share one experience in Scrooge’s past that shows him how to be a better person.  Provide details of what he saw.
 
5) Explain how thinking about our past can help us in the present.  Provide at least one effective example.
 

Mon. 12/11 – “A Christmas Carol,” Act I

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel, 20 minutes every night.  “Christmas Carol” vocabulary packet due Friday; quiz Thursday 12/21.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO begin reading a dramatic adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”  Act I performers, be ready to emote!

DO NOW – Set up today’s notebook page: “12/11 – A Christmas Carol Act 1”

A Christmas Carol, Act 1

  1. In your own words, define “Bah! Humbug!”
  2. Share three examples of Scrooge’s thoughts or actions and what they reveal about his character.
  3. Explain the metaphor of the chains around Marley.  What do they symbolize about his life? 

12/8 – Charles Dickens

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Read your novel 20 minutes per night.  Finish novel and notebook work by the end of the holiday break (1/1/18).  Project due 1/9/18.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO learn a little bit about Charles Dickens, a 19th-century English author considered second only to William Shakespeare in terms of his contribution to English literature.

ALSO – When you receive the signup sheet, write down your name and the title and author of your novel.

DO NOW – Set up a notebook page for today’s work: “12/8 – Charles Dickens”

Divide your page into four quadrants.  Label the four sections LIFE WRITING VALUES QUESTIONS

As you watch the video, write down details you learn about Charles Dickens.  Add them to the four sections of the page.  Write down questions you might have as well.

The Life of Charles Dickens

Next week, we will be reading a play adaptation of Dickens’ most famous work, “A Christmas Carol.”  We will take a few minutes to cast the play today.  There are EIGHT major parts, SIX supporting roles, and 18 minor parts.  We will be reading the play in five acts over five days.

For the rest of the period, finish up your “Whisper” Essay.  As soon as it is finished, log into turnitin.com and submit your paper.

If you are finished, you can read your novels silently.

Thu. 12/7 – “Whisper” Essay Writing and Submission


WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK – Book signup tomorrow.   Make sure you are committed to your selection. 

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO write an essay about a theme in Paul Zindel’s play, “Let Me Hear You Whisper,” and then submit your assignment via turnitin.com

DO NOW

  • Log into your laptop.
  • Log into the email you used to set up your turnitin.com account.
  • You should have a link to confirm your account.
  • You will then have to find ANOTHER email link that requires you to re-enter your password (you can use the same one you used originally).
  • After that, make sure you can log into your turnitin.com account.  You should see your English class listed.  If you click on it, you will see a button for submitting your essay when you are ready.
  • Now, get ready to write.  Take a copy of the play off of the table if you need one.  

“Let Me Hear You Whisper” Theme Essay

DIRECTIONS:

Read the statements below and write down the one that expresses the theme in the play that most interests you.  Explain your choice using details from the story.  You may also use evidence from other sources to support your position.

CHOOSE ONE TOPIC:

  • Animals should not be used for research or forced to work for humans.
  • Personal feelings have no place in scientific research.
  • People should take a stand against something that they think is wrong, even if it will cost them.

USE THE FOLLOWING FORMAT:

Your essay response should include an introduction, a body paragraph, and a conclusion.

INTRODUCTION – Introduce the topic, the play, and make your position about the topic clear.

BODY – Discuss your reasons for your position, supporting your reasoning with examples from the play and from other sources.  Be sure to credit the sources and place any text in quotes that is not your own writing.  Also, recognize and respond to what others might say who disagree (the counterclaims). You may choose to write multiple body paragraphs if it will provide better organization of your thoughts.

CONCLUSION – Sum up your main points and provide some final insights about the topic.

WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED:

  • Proof read and edit your writing.
  • Save your file.
  • Follow these directions to upload your file to turnitin.com:

Students can submit papers to assignments which have been created by an instructor.

To submit a paper using file upload, please do the following:

  1. Log into your account.
  2. Click on the title of the class you wish to submit to.
  3. Click on the blue “Submit” button for the assignment you wish to submit to. If there is a grey “Submit” button, submissions are not allowed for this assignment. Please check the assignment start and due dates and the assignment info icon*.
  4. From the “Submit” heading at the top of the page, select the “Single File Upload” option. If “Cut & Paste Upload” is showing, click on the arrow to select “Single File Upload.”
  5. Enter the title of your paper in the “Submission Title” field.
  6. Select an upload option (see below)
  7. Click the “Upload” button at the bottom. 
  8. STOP, and WAIT for the next page to appear.
  9. Click “Confirm” to confirm your submission.

Upload Options:

“Choose from this computer” – Browse to a file saved on the computer. Select the file and then click “Open.”

“Choose from Google Drive™” – Browse to a Document file from your Google Drive account and then click “Select.” (You may need to click “Accept” before connecting).

Important: after your paper is successfully submitted, your digital receipt will be displayed on screen. The digital receipt has a Submission ID number, which is confirmation that Turnitin has received your paper.  If you do not see a digital receipt with a Submission ID number, then your paper was not successfully received by Turnitin. The digital receipt is also emailed to you as well. 

Troubleshooting:
If you are unable to upload your paper, there could be a problem with the formatting of your file. Please re-save your paper in a different file format. If submitting with Google Drive, third party cookies must be allowed in their browser, or attempts to sign into Google to upload from Google Drive will fail. 

Wed. 12/6 – Library Day / Novel Selection

WRITE DOWN YOUR HOMEWORK

  • Bring your novel to class tomorrow and Friday.
  • Book signup Friday: read at least the first 30 pages to ensure you are committed to reading the book.
  • Also check your email for a confirmation link to finish setup of your turnitin.com account.

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO select a novel to read for the next few weeks.

  • Select a novel that you will be able to finish reading in 3-4 weeks.
  • You may choose a work of narrative nonfiction, or a biography, subject to approval.
  • Spend time today browsing the library’s selections.
  • Find a comfortable place to read without distractions.
  • Read quietly.  This is not social time.  If you need help, ask an adult.

 

Tue. 12/5 – Turnitin.com

NO HOMEWORK.  Report to the library tomorrow!

TODAY’S GOAL IS TO make sure you can access your Roslyn email account and join Mr. Huntley’s Turnitin.com class.  You will also begin working on your “Let Me Hear You Whisper” theme analysis essay.

DO NOW: After writing down the homework, log into your laptop and go to mail.roslynschools.org or just type mail in your browser (it should take you to the same place).

The page should look like this:

Click on the link to the Roslyn Student Email.

  • Your email account is your school network login @roslynschools.org.
  • Your password is your school network password.

Once you know your email account is working, go to turnitin.com

  • In the upper right corner, choose create account
  • On the next page, under create a new account, choose student.
  • Follow the instructions and complete the setup page correctly.
  • Use the Class ID and Class Enrollment Key written on the whiteboard.
  • Suggestion: use the same password as your school network login so you won’t forget it, or write it down inside your notebook cover.
  • Check your email account for further instructions.  You may need to set up your password again via a confirmation link.

When you are finished with the setup, you can begin working on your essay.  Find your “Let Me Hear You Whisper” handout and look at Reflection B.  You will select one of the themes and write a brief essay about it.  The format will be as follows:

An introduction paragraph that provides some background about the conflict and plot of the play, then presents and explains the theme.

A body paragraph that makes use of details from the play to explain how the theme is shown.

A concluding paragraph in which you provide your own insights into the theme.  Discussion may include your personal feelings about the idea behind the theme, your own experiences or connection to the theme, or your reasons why your reader should consider the theme to be important.